Daily OMI tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) measurements over The Netherlands and Western Europe

Tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) over The Netherlands and Western Europe (last 24 hours)
The Netherlands and Western Europe air pollution (last 24 hours)

Today's satellite air quality measurements are available around 15:00 hours GMT for Europe. OMI (on the EOS-Aura satellite) passes over Europe around 12:45 hours (GMT) and it takes another 2-2.5 hours before the data are available here. The most recent air quality measurements can be viewed in Google Earth. The TEMIS web site contains a limited archive of air quality and air pollution Google Earth files.

Daily OMI tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) measurements over other regions in the world
Also available on the TEMIS web site.

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Archive OMI news

2008


Beijing Restrictions Reduce Pollution

Date: 18 12 2008

Chinese officials took extreme measures to improve Beijing's air quality for the 2008 summer Olympic games. Factories were closed and traffic was restricted for two months. Did the restrictions make a difference?

According to newly released research conducted by NASA researchers, they did. In August and September 2008, concentrations of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide - pollutants released when fossil fuels are burned in cars, trucks, and power plants - fell dramatically over Beijing.

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Volcanic Haze over Hawaii

Date: 06 12 2008

Dense, gray-white haze hung low over the Hawaiian Islands on December 3, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this image. Though seldom so thick or widespread, the haze is common in Hawaii. It forms when sulfur dioxide from the islands’ volcanoes mixes with oxygen and water in the atmosphere. The tiny sulfate particles that make up vog reflect light well so that vog shows up easily when viewed from space. A little less than 10 minutes after Aqua MODIS captured this image, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite also detected high levels of sulfur dioxide over and around the island of Hawaii.

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Sulfur Dioxide from smelters at Noril'sk (Russia)

Date: 05 12 2008

This image shows average concentrations of sulfur dioxide from the Noril’sk facility, measured by OMI. The measurements are for the months of June through August from 2005 through 2007.

Significant amounts of nickel, palladium and copper, come from one place: Siberia’s Noril’sk smelting facility. The mining facility supports a population of roughly 200.000 people, yet it has also created some of the world’s worst air pollution.

Large amounts of sulfur dioxide cause eye irritation, respiratory damage, and acid rain. Around the Noril’sk mining facility, expanses of dead forest testify to the acid rain’s impact. By 2007, at least 1.2 million acres (4,850 square kilometers) of trees had died.

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Sulfur Dioxide from smelters at Noril'sk (Russia)

Date: 01 12 2008

This image shows average concentrations of sulfur dioxide from the Noril’sk facility, measured by OMI. The measurements are for the months of June through August from 2005 through 2007.

Significant amounts of nickel, palladium and copper, come from one place: Siberia’s Noril’sk smelting facility. The mining facility supports a population of roughly 200.000 people, yet it has also created some of the world’s worst air pollution.

Large amounts of sulfur dioxide cause eye irritation, respiratory damage, and acid rain. Around the Noril’sk mining facility, expanses of dead forest testify to the acid rain’s impact. By 2007, at least 1.2 million acres (4,850 square kilometers) of trees had died.

Read more ...



Earth surface reflectance climatology from 3 years of OMI data

Date: 14 11 2008

The reflectance of the Earth surface is a critical parameter for satellite retrievals of the atmospheric trace gases, clouds and aerosols. Also, it is often a critial parameter to describe the radiation balance in climate models. Kleipool et al. [2008] used three years of data from OMI to derive the surface reflectance of the globe on a 0.5 by 0.5 degree grid for every month of the year. The reflectance is given for 23 wavelengths between 328 and 500 nm. The data compares well with existing albedo climatologies derived from other satellite instruments (TOMS, GOME, MODIS), and significantly improves on these data sets by better spectral and/or spatial resolution.

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Fires in California

Date: 06 11 2008

Smoke from the recent outbreak of fires in Southern California can clearly be seen from NASA satellites. MODIS observations show the smoke drifting to the southwest from the Los Angeles basin over the waters of the Pacific Ocean. OMI measurements show aerosols, tiny particles within smoke.

In the MODIS image, the smoke disappears when it moves over the bright surface of the low-level marine stratocumulus clouds. The OMI aerosol index measurement reveals, however, that smoke is present over the clouds. Such ultraviolet measurements from instruments like OMI are useful to scientists working to understand how aerosols affect clouds.

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The Ozone Hole of 2008

Date: 25 10 2008

On September 12, 2008, the Antarctic ozone hole reached its maximum size for the year. Represented by blues and purples in this image from OMI, the ozone hole covered about 27 million square kilometers, making it larger than North America, which is about 25 million square kilometers. Though larger than it was in 2007, the 2008 ozone hole was still smaller than the record set in 2006.

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The Ozone Hole of 2008

Date: 11 09 2008

On September 12, 2008, the Antarctic ozone hole reached its maximum size for the year. Represented by blues and purples in this image from OMI, the ozone hole covered about 27 million square kilometers, making it larger than North America, which is about 25 million square kilometers. Though larger than it was in 2007, the 2008 ozone hole was still smaller than the record set in 2006.

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DANDELIONS 2005 and 2006 Campaigns at Cabauw: Intercomparisons of NO2 measurements

Date: 03 09 2008

The 2005 and 2006 DANDELIONS campaigns were unique because they brought together an unprecedented variety of measurement techniques to measure NO2, aerosols and ozone at Cabauw, The Netherlands. Also unique was that in 2006, the vertical dimension was used by placing instrumentation at ground level as well as in the 220 m. tower.

Using these ground-based instruments viewing in different directions, in-situ instruments, and a NO2 lidar, Brinksma et al. [2008] show significant spatial variability in NO_2 fields, depending on the direction in which one looks. This means that the modest agreement (r=0.6) found between the ground-based and OMI NO2 retrievals is as good as it gets.

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Aleutian Islands Kasatochi Volcano Erupts - Part 3

Date: 13 08 2008

The plume of sulfur dioxide from the eruption of the Kasatochi Volcano in the first week of August continued its trans-continental trek across North America on August 13, 2008. This image based on data from OMI shows sulfur dioxide concentrations high in the atmosphere (higher than urban and industrial pollution would be found). The volcanic gas spread across the Arctic and also dipped southward across Canada and into the Northeast United States

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Aleutian Islands Kasatochi Volcano Erupts - Part 2

Date: 12 08 2008

Sulfur dioxide from the eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the Aleutian Islands on August 8 continued to spread eastward on August 12 and was observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite. Winds were moving the gas in a large counter clockwise loop over the Pacific Ocean and back toward Alaska, but also spreading streamers over the Arctic and eastward across the United States and Canada.

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Aleutian Islands Kasatochi Volcano Erupts - Part 1

Date: 10 08 2008

Between August 7 and August 8, 2008, three explosive eruptions rocked the Kasatochi Volcano in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. The volcano released a large cloud of sulfur dioxide. In the days that followed the eruption, the Ozone Monitoring Instrument on NASA's Aura satellite tracked a dense cloud that contained about 1.5 million tons of sulfur dioxide.

It was one of the largest volcanic sulfur dioxide clouds scientists have observed since Chile's Hudson volcano erupted in August 1991.

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Daily Air Quality Forecast for China

Date: 27 07 2008

The AMFIC project addresses atmospheric environmental monitoring over China. The aim is to develop an integrated information system for monitoring and forecasting tropospheric pollutants over China. The web site of the forecast service has been launched recently. Every day it publishes a 3-day forecast calculated by the chemical transport model Chimere. The model runs with the emission inventory of Street et al, 2006. Satellite data from OMI and GOME-2 is used to adjust the emissions for the effect of the air quality measures taken by the Beijing authorities during the Olympic Games.

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Okmok eruption (incl. movie)

Date: 23 07 2008

A strong explosive eruption of Okmok began abruptly on 12 July 2008, sending a cloud of volcanic ash and gas to about 17 km altitude in the lower stratosphere. Satellite tracking of the ash cloud by traditional infrared (IR) techniques was hampered by the high water content of the volcanic plume. However, sulfur dioxide (SO2) measurements from OMI permitted tracking of the eruption cloud in near real-time, as it drifted south of the Aleutians across the North Pacific and then eastwards across the conterminous United States and Canada. Airlines were rerouted aircraft to avoid the Okmok volcanic cloudit due to the potential threat of volcanic ash in the cloud.

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Okmok eruption (incl. movie)

Date: 01 07 2008

A strong explosive eruption of Okmok began abruptly on 12 July 2008, sending a cloud of volcanic ash and gas to about 17 km altitude in the lower stratosphere. Satellite tracking of the ash cloud by traditional infrared (IR) techniques was hampered by the high water content of the volcanic plume. However, sulfur dioxide (SO2) measurements from OMI permitted tracking of the eruption cloud in near real-time, as it drifted south of the Aleutians across the North Pacific and then eastwards across the conterminous United States and Canada. Airlines were rerouted aircraft to avoid the Okmok volcanic cloudit due to the potential threat of volcanic ash in the cloud.

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Assuring quality for long-term ozone trend studies

Date: 01 07 2008

The record of total ozone derived from the TOMS instrument series since November 1978 and continued by OMI since July 2004, is the longest to date and essential to study the recovery of the ozone layer. To verify the quality of the OMI-TOMS ozone data and its potential for trend analysis, Kroon et al. [2008] compare two ozone retrieval methods applied for the OMI instrument.

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The eye of the beholder

Date: 02 06 2008

OMI uses reflected sunlight to retrieve concentrations of trace gases in the atmosphere, like O3 and NO2. These retrieved trace gas amounts must be corrected for the presence of clouds in the atmosphere. Cloud heights are derived from OMI observations of scattered light in the UV-visible range. However, satellite imagers like MODIS use thermal infra-red radiation, emitted by the clouds themselves. The two observation methods give a different view of clouds: OMI sees the middle of the cloud, whereas MODIS sees the top of the cloud.

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Springtime OMI Measurements of Bromine Monoxide (BrO) (incl. animation)

Date: 28 05 2008

Despite its low atmospheric abundance, bromine monoxide (BrO) plays an important role in the chemistry of the atmosphere because of its very high efficiency as a catalyst of the ozone destruction.

The role of BrO has been highlighted first in the context of the stratospheric ozone layer problematic. Recent findings, however, have demonstrated that BrO is also produced with significant amounts in the troposphere where it can influence the chemistry of tropospheric ozone.

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Aerosols and SO2 from Chaiten Volcano

Date: 24 05 2008

On May 2, 2008, the Chaitén Volcano of southern Chile rumbled to life. The eruption was a surprise - it was Chaitén's first eruption in more than 9,000 years. It blanketed some nearby areas in as much as 1.5 meters of volcanic ash. It also send a cloud of ash high into the atmosphere. Are we in for a cool summer in the wake of the eruption, like the summer Philippine's Mount Pinatubo erupted?

Most likely not, and the reason is illustrated in this pair of images with observations made by OMI. The images compare total aerosols, tiny particles of both ash and sulfates to the part of the plume made up of sulfur dioxide alone.

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Aerosols and SO2 from Chaiten Volcano

Date: 11 05 2008

On May 2, 2008, the Chaitén Volcano of southern Chile rumbled to life. The eruption was a surprise - it was Chaitén's first eruption in more than 9,000 years. It blanketed some nearby areas in as much as 1.5 meters of volcanic ash. It also send a cloud of ash high into the atmosphere. Are we in for a cool summer in the wake of the eruption, like the summer Philippine's Mount Pinatubo erupted?

Most likely not, and the reason is illustrated in this pair of images with observations made by OMI. The images compare total aerosols, tiny particles of both ash and sulfates to the part of the plume made up of sulfur dioxide alone.

Read more ...



Sulfur Dioxide and Vog from Kilauea

Date: 30 04 2008

In late April 2008, Kilauea Volcano Volcano on Hawaii's big island continued its pattern of increased activity, including elevated seismic tremors and emissions. Two NASA satellite sensors observed different aspects of the volcano's activity on April 26, 2008. As Kilauea emitted ash and steam, the sensors recorded both the visible volcanic emissions (a volcanic smog known as vog), and the concentrations of one volcanic pollutant not visible to human eyes (SO2).

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Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Kilauea

Date: 29 03 2008

Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, but it is of the sort that tends to ooze lava more often than it explodes. Until March 19, 2008 occurred in 1924. But starting on March 19, a small explosion from the crater rained rock and ash over the summit. The explosion heralded further activity at the summit, including a two- to four-fold increase in the amount of sulfur dioxide (SO2) seeping from the volcano.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory warned on March 28 that SO2 concentrations in the air downwind from the volcano were likely to be hazardous.

OMI recorded the increase in SO2 rising out of Kilauea between March 20 and March 27, 2008. Throughout the period, the easterly trade winds swept a long plume of sulfur dioxide south and west, away from major populated areas.

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Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Kilauea

Date: 14 02 2008

Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, but it is of the sort that tends to ooze lava more often than it explodes. Until March 19, 2008 occurred in 1924. But starting on March 19, a small explosion from the crater rained rock and ash over the summit. The explosion heralded further activity at the summit, including a two- to four-fold increase in the amount of sulfur dioxide (SO2) seeping from the volcano.

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory warned on March 28 that SO2 concentrations in the air downwind from the volcano were likely to be hazardous.

OMI recorded the increase in SO2 rising out of Kilauea between March 20 and March 27, 2008. Throughout the period, the easterly trade winds swept a long plume of sulfur dioxide south and west, away from major populated areas.

Read more ...



Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Llaima Volcano

Date: 09 01 2008

On January 1, 2008, Chile\u2019s Llaima Volcano erupted, raining ash on the local wilderness park and sending a column of smoke skyward. In addition to volcanic ash, Llaima\u2019s eruption released a plume of sulfur dioxide. The initially intense plume thinned as it moved eastward. This image, acquired by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA\u2019s Aura satellite, shows the progress of that plume from January 2-4, 2008.

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