Daily OMI tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) measurements over The Netherlands and Western Europe

Tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) over The Netherlands and Western Europe (last 24 hours)
The Netherlands and Western Europe air pollution (last 24 hours)

Today's satellite air quality measurements are available around 15:00 hours GMT for Europe. OMI (on the EOS-Aura satellite) passes over Europe around 12:45 hours (GMT) and it takes another 2-2.5 hours before the data are available here. The most recent air quality measurements can be viewed in Google Earth. The TEMIS web site contains a limited archive of air quality and air pollution Google Earth files.

Daily OMI tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) measurements over other regions in the world
Also available on the TEMIS web site.

info  Disclaimer

Archive OMI news

2009


Date: 14 12 2009



Date: 24 11 2009



Date: 16 11 2009



OMI observes reduction of Sulfur dioxide pollution over China

Date: 10 10 2009

Chinese sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission controls were given a major strengthening in the 11th Five-Year-Plan. Power plants (mostly coal fueled) emitted an estimated 18 million tonnes of SO2 and half as much NOx in 2006 and contributed the largest amounts anthropogenic SO2 and NOx in China. OMI observations of the decrease in SO2 suggests that the SO2 controlling measures were widely applied in power plants between 2007 and 2008. Similar trends have been observed with other satellite instruments (GOME, SCIAMACHY).

Read more ...



Smoke transported from the California station fire

Date: 09 10 2009

Although there are some gaps in coverage (e.g., over Nevada on 31 August), these images show that the smoke from the California station fire was dispersed over a large region. Residents of Denver reported that they could smell the smoke and that visibility was poor.

Read more ...



OMI Detects Air Quality Changes Resulting from NOx Emission Regulations

Date: 08 10 2009

Regulations have resulted in reduced NOx emissions from major point sources over much of the Eastern US as shown by OMI's Continuous Emission Monitoring System data.

Read more ...



Combined use of A-train data for improved aerosol characterization

Date: 07 10 2009

Aura-OMI near-UV observations are sensitive to aerosol absorption. Information on aerosol layer height is needed to retrieve single scattering albedo (SSA), the ratio of scattering efficiency to total light extinction. OMI cannot measure the height of an aerosol layer, but CALIPSO, flying just a few minutes apart in the same orbit as Aura, does measure the height. OMI and CALIPSO aerosol observations combined together improves the OMI SSA retrievals.

Read more ...



Combined use of A-train data for improved cloud study

Date: 06 10 2009

The A-train detection of distinct multi-layer clouds is important for calculating radiative forcing, evaluating model cloud parameterizations, and obtaining accurate trace gas retrievals.

  • OMI and MODIS are passive sensors with excellent daily spatial coverage, and sensitivity to different parts of a cloud.
  • The CloudSat radar provides excellent vertical information, but with limited spatial coverage; it is used to evaluate OMI/MODIS results.
The combined use of all this A-train data results in an improved cloud characterization and the ability to detect multi-layer clouds.

Read more ...



OMI NO2 trends: 2007 - 2005 annual means

Date: 05 10 2009

Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) criteria pollutant. It contributes to the formation of ground-level ozone. Anthropogenic sources of NO2 include power plants and transportation. The identification of humans as the main driver of global warming helps us understand how and why our climate is changing, and it clearly defines the problem as one that is within our power to address.

Read more ...



The Impact of the 2005 Gulf Hurricanes as Seen by OMI

Date: 04 10 2009

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita caused a significant reduction in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions from oil and gas production facilities as well as power plants.

Read more ...



Emission Reductions California Show Results

Date: 03 10 2009

NO2 is more concentrated in more densely populated urban areas. NO2 forms quickly from emissions from cars, trucks and buses, power plants, and off-road equipment. In addition to contributing to the formation of ground-level ozone, and fine particle pollution, NO2 is linked with a number of adverse effects.

Over the past several years, California has enforced aggressive air quality regulations. Results of this action can be seen in Aura's OMI imagery. OMI shows that decreases in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns over the 4 years 2005-2008 approach 40%.

Read more ...



Filling up the gaps in OMI data using A-train data for SO2 released during the Sarychev Peak eruptio

Date: 02 10 2009

Beginning in May 2007, some OMI cross-track scenes began to show radiance anomalies, impacting the quality of the level 1B and level 2 data products. These anomalies have since expanded and currently affect ~25% of OMI cross-track scenes, creating data gaps in OMI level 2 data products.

Synergy between A-Train instruments permits 'filling-in' of the OMI data gaps with near-coincident SO2 retrievals from the AIRS instrument on Aqua, about 8 minutes ahead of Aura, as demonstrated with observations of the Sarychev Peak (Kurile Islands) eruption in mid-June 2009.

The Sarychev Peak eruption was the second significant SO2 injection (~about Tg SO2) into the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratosphere in a year, following the eruption of Kasatochi volcano (Aleutian Islands) in August 2008 (about 1.4 Tg SO2). Due to these recent eruptions, stratospheric sulfate aerosol concentrations in the NH may be elevated compared to recent years, with possible impacts on atmospheric chemistry and radiation.

Read more ...



Air Pollution Controls for Summer Surface Ozone as Deduced by OMI

Date: 01 10 2009

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measures formaldehyde (HCHO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and the ratio of HCHO to NO2 for August 2005 shows how these data can be used to develop effective strategies to improve air quality.

Read more ...



Antarctic Ozone Hole 2009

Date: 17 09 2009

The annual ozone hole started developing over the South Pole in late August 2009, and by September 10, it appeared that the ozone hole of 2009 would be comparable to ozone depletions over the past decade. However, we won’t know for another four weeks how this year’s ozone hole will fully develop.

September 16 marks the International Day for the Protection of the Ozone Layer, declared by the United Nations to commemorate the date when the Montreal Protocol was signed to ban use of ozone-depleting chemicals such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

Read more ...



Smoke from Fires in Russia & Canada and Alaska

Date: 14 08 2009

In late July and early August 2009, fires raged in Russia, Canada, and Alaska, sending aerosols (airborne particles) skyward over the Arctic. This aerosol index image is based on observations by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA’s Aura satellite on August 1 and 2, 2009.

Read more ...



Relative Amounts of Bad Ozone Ingredients Across the U.S.

Date: 09 08 2009

When ozone forms at ground level, it can cause respiratory illness and can damage crops and other plants. At the Earth’s surface, the ingredients for making ozone are nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds (organic chemicals that vaporize easily). Both of these ingredients are found in the air pollution from vehicles (and gasoline vapors), power plants, and industrial activities, but volatile organics are also released naturally from trees and other vegetation.

Because both kinds of chemicals—plus summertime sunlight and heat—are needed to make ground-level ozone, regulators could control ozone production by reducing only one ingredient. But which one? These maps, based upon OMI measurements, show a satellite-based approach to deciding when it would be more effective to reduce nitrogen oxides and when it would be more effective to reduce volatile organic compounds.

Read more ...



Dust Storm over Iraq and Iran

Date: 22 07 2009

In early July 2009, Iraq experienced the worst dust storm in living memory, according to news reports. The storm raged over Iraq for more than a week, causing hundreds of hospitalizations and claiming at least three lives. The dust spread eastward to Iran and also hovered over the Arabian Peninsula.

Satellites that acquire photo-like images of the Earth can give a general sense of how thick a dust plume is, namely whether it’s thin enough to allow a fuzzy glimpse of the surface below, or thick enough to completely obscure the underlying land or ocean. OMI provides another view of dust storms by measuring their effects on sunlight. Aerosols—solid or liquid particles suspended in the air—can absorb or reflect sunlight before it reaches Earth’s surface.

Read more ...



Dust Storm over Iraq and Iran

Date: 03 07 2009

In early July 2009, Iraq experienced the worst dust storm in living memory, according to news reports. The storm raged over Iraq for more than a week, causing hundreds of hospitalizations and claiming at least three lives. The dust spread eastward to Iran and also hovered over the Arabian Peninsula.

Satellites that acquire photo-like images of the Earth can give a general sense of how thick a dust plume is, namely whether it’s thin enough to allow a fuzzy glimpse of the surface below, or thick enough to completely obscure the underlying land or ocean. OMI provides another view of dust storms by measuring their effects on sunlight. Aerosols—solid or liquid particles suspended in the air—can absorb or reflect sunlight before it reaches Earth’s surface.

Read more ...



September Smoke Over the Amazon from 2005-2008

Date: 30 06 2009

Prior to widespread human settlement and forest clearing, there was no such thing as a fire season in the Amazon Rainforest. Today, burning begins in August, generally peaks in September, and tapers off by October; during these months, the skies over the Amazon fill with smoke.

Recently, atmospheric scientist Omar Torres of Hampton University and several colleagues investigated yearly patterns in the intensity of the Amazon fire season. Scientists use the amount of smoke and fires in the Amazon as an indicator of how much of the Amazon was cleared or degraded each year, but the burning has other impacts. Fires release large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, adding to global warming.

Read more ...



September Smoke Over the Amazon from 2005-2008

Date: 29 06 2009

Prior to widespread human settlement and forest clearing, there was no such thing as a fire season in the Amazon Rainforest. Today, burning begins in August, generally peaks in September, and tapers off by October; during these months, the skies over the Amazon fill with smoke.

Recently, atmospheric scientist Omar Torres of Hampton University and several colleagues investigated yearly patterns in the intensity of the Amazon fire season. Scientists use the amount of smoke and fires in the Amazon as an indicator of how much of the Amazon was cleared or degraded each year, but the burning has other impacts. Fires release large amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, adding to global warming.

Read more ...



Sarychev Eruption Generates Large Cloud of Sulfur Dioxide

Date: 18 06 2009

Atmospheric scientists are interested in tracking sulfur dioxide because it can endanger public health and because it can affect global climate. In mid-June 2009, Sarychev Peak Volcano on Matua Island in the northwest Pacific began a series of eruptions of large amounts of ash. According to atmospheric scientist Simon Carn, who is part of the science team for the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on NASA's Aura satellite, it was also almost certainly the largest sulfur dioxide event so far this year.

Read more ...



Antarctic Ozone Hole: 1979 to 2008

Date: 02 06 2009

This pair of images show the beginning and end of a nearly 30-year series of images of the Antarctic Ozone Hole feature. The 1979 image was captured by NASA’s Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument aboard Nimbus-7, and the 2008 image is from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) that flies on NASA’s Aura satellite.

Read more ...



Satellite Measurements Help Reveal Ozone Damage to Important Crops

Date: 27 05 2009

The U.S. soybean crop is suffering nearly $2 billion in damage a year due to rising surface ozone concentrations harming plants and reducing the crop’s yield potential, a NASA-led study has concluded. The study is based on five years of soybean yields, surface ozone, and satellite measurements of tropospheric ozone levels in Indiana, Illinois and Iowa.

This study proved that space-borne satellite measurements of tropospheric ozone – derived from NASA’s Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) prior to 2005, and from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) since 2005– have provided useful indicators of surface ozone concentration over a far broader area than ground-based monitors.

Read more ...



The World We Avoided by Protecting the Ozone Layer

Date: 13 05 2009

The year is 2065. Nearly two-thirds of Earth’s ozone is gone—not just over the poles, but everywhere. The infamous ozone hole over Antarctica, first discovered in the 1980s, is a year-round fixture, with a twin over the North Pole. The ultraviolet (UV) radiation falling on mid-latitude cities like Washington, D.C., is strong enough to cause sunburn in just five minutes. DNA-mutating UV radiation is up more than 500 percent, with likely harmful effects on plants, animals, and human skin cancer rates.

Such is the world we would have inherited if 193 nations had not agreed to ban ozone-depleting chemicals, according to atmospheric chemists from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, the Johns Hopkins University, and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency. Led by Goddard scientist Paul Newman, the team used a state-of-the-art model to learn “what might have been” if chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and similar chemicals had not been banned through the 1989 Montreal Protocol, the first-ever international agreement on regulation of chemical pollutants, and later agreements limiting CFCs.

Read more ...



Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Isla Fernandina

Date: 14 04 2009

In early April 2009, La Cumbre Volcano on Isla Fernandina in the Galapagos Islands erupted, producing an ash plume and lava flows. The eruption also produced a substantial cloud of sulfur dioxide that extended far west of the islands, over the Pacific Ocean.

Read more ...



OMI Collection 3: improved level-1b data

Date: 23 03 2009

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument is equipped with a CCD-camera that allows simultaneous Earth-viewing under 60 individual angles. In the first years of operation, this novel technique appeared susceptible to calibration offsets that changed with viewing angle.

As described in a recent paper, Dobber et al. [2008] have significantly improved the calibration of the OMI level-1b data. They show that with these improvements, the accuracy of the geophysically calibrated level 1b radiance and irradiance is much better in the collection 3 data.

Read more ...



OMI Collection 3: improved level-1b data

Date: 17 03 2009

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument is equipped with a CCD-camera that allows simultaneous Earth-viewing under 60 individual angles. In the first years of operation, this novel technique appeared susceptible to calibration offsets that changed with viewing angle.

As described in a recent paper, Dobber et al. [2008] have significantly improved the calibration of the OMI level-1b data. They show that with these improvements, the accuracy of the geophysically calibrated level 1b radiance and irradiance is much better in the collection 3 data.

Read more ...



Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from the Maritsa Iztok power plant (Bulgaria)

Date: 27 01 2009

When we burn fossil fuels, extract metals from ores, or make gasoline from oil, sulfur in the raw materials combines with oxygen in the atmosphere and produces sulfur dioxide (SO2). When volcanoes erupt, they also release huge amounts of the gas. SO2 causes acid rain, and it contributes to smog. It also leads to the formation of light-reflecting sulfate particles, which cool the climate.

Satellite sensors, such as OMI, provide daily global maps of SO2. These maps provide valuable input for air quality models, for assessing the impact of emissions on ecosystems, and for climate prediction models.

This image shows measurements of SO2 in the air over one of the largest power plants in eastern Europe, the Maritsa Iztok Complex in Bulgaria.

Read more ...



© OMI -- Last update: Tuesday, 09-May-2017 03:06:14 UTC. --