Daily OMI tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) measurements over The Netherlands and Western Europe

Tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) over The Netherlands and Western Europe (last 24 hours)
The Netherlands and Western Europe air pollution (last 24 hours)

Today's satellite air quality measurements are available around 15:00 hours GMT for Europe. OMI (on the EOS-Aura satellite) passes over Europe around 12:45 hours (GMT) and it takes another 2-2.5 hours before the data are available here. The most recent air quality measurements can be viewed in Google Earth. The TEMIS web site contains a limited archive of air quality and air pollution Google Earth files.

Daily OMI tropospheric NO2 (air pollution) measurements over other regions in the world
Also available on the TEMIS web site.

info  Disclaimer

Archive OMI news

2011


SO2 Pollution Controls Bring Results

Date: 02 12 2011

Scientists, regulators, and the electric power industry came together to address a pollution problem, and the result is cleaner air in the United States. The pollutant is sulfur dioxide, a key emission from coal-fired power plants that contributes to the formation of acid rain and to respiratory health problems.

Read more ...



2011 Antarctic Ozone Minimum

Date: 21 10 2011

Scientists from NASA and the NOAA confirmed today that ozone depletion over the South Pole in 2011 has reached its annual maximum. Researchers used satellites, ground based monitors, and instrumented balloons to observe the hole, finding it to be among the top 10 worst for the breadth and depth of ozone loss in the 26 year record.

Read more ...



Study of Unprecedented Arctic Ozone Loss

Date: 03 10 2011

A NASA-led study has documented an unprecedented depletion of Earth's protective ozone layer above the Arctic last winter and spring caused by an unusually prolonged period of extremely low temperatures in the stratosphere.

The study, published online Sunday, Oct. 2, in the journal Nature, finds the amount of ozone destroyed in the Arctic in 2011 was comparable to that seen in some years in the Antarctic, where an ozone "hole" has formed each spring since the mid-1980s.

Read more ...



Study of Unprecedented Arctic Ozone Loss

Date: 23 09 2011

A NASA-led study has documented an unprecedented depletion of Earth's protective ozone layer above the Arctic last winter and spring caused by an unusually prolonged period of extremely low temperatures in the stratosphere.

The study, published online Sunday, Oct. 2, in the journal Nature, finds the amount of ozone destroyed in the Arctic in 2011 was comparable to that seen in some years in the Antarctic, where an ozone "hole" has formed each spring since the mid-1980s.

Read more ...



Pollution in the Great Lakes Region

Date: 21 07 2011

Fires throughout Ontario, Canada are generating pollution that is showing up in NO2 data from OMI in the Great Lakes region. The fires have also forced thousands of residents to evacuate to other areas in Canada, according to CBC News. About 112 fires have ravaged 81,545 acres so far

Read more ...



Pollution "Butterfly"

Date: 15 07 2011

Fires raging in central Africa are generating a high amount of pollution that is showing up in NO2 data from OMI, with the ominous shape of a dark red butterfly in the skies over southern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and northern Angola.

Read more ...



Pollution from New Mexico, Arizona Fires

Date: 01 07 2011

OMI has provided a view of nitrogen dioxide levels coming from the fires in New Mexico and Arizona. Detecting nitrogen dioxide is important because it reacts with sunlight to create low-level ozone or smog and poor air quality.

Read more ...



Ash from Puyehue-Cordón Caulle circles the globe

Date: 18 06 2011

In its early, violent days, the eruption at the Puyehue-Cordón Caulle volcanic complex sent clouds of ash high into the atmosphere. Rising some 15 kilometers into the air, the ash settled into a jet of fast-moving wind on a trip around the world.

The ash remained concentrated as it circled the globe in the stratosphere - enough so that it was visible in photo-like images over New Zealand and Australia. It was also concentrated enough to disrupt air travel in those countries.

Read more ...



Grímsvötn Volcano Eruption (incl. movie)

Date: 02 06 2011

The Grímsvötn volcano in southeast Iceland started eruption on 21 May 21. The plume rose to an altitude of about 20km. Various satellite sensors followed the ash cloud. OMI's ultraviolet aerosol index allows volcanic ash to be detected over clouds whereas this is more difficult with a visible image. OMI also measured the sulfur dioxide (SO2) released by the volcano. The movie shows that the SO2 moved in a different direction than the ash cloud.

Read more ...



Grímsvötn Volcano Eruption (incl. movie)

Date: 25 05 2011

The Grímsvötn volcano in southeast Iceland started eruption on 21 May 21. The plume rose to an altitude of about 20km. Various satellite sensors followed the ash cloud. OMI's ultraviolet aerosol index allows volcanic ash to be detected over clouds whereas this is more difficult with a visible image. OMI also measured the sulfur dioxide (SO2) released by the volcano. The movie shows that the SO2 moved in a different direction than the ash cloud.

Read more ...



Dust Blown from Africa to Scandinavia

Date: 15 04 2011

Atmospheric scientists track aerosols because they have important impacts on weather, climate, and human health. Mineral dust is one of the most abundant aerosols, a product of winds blowing across our deserts and beaches, picking up tiny bits of rock and sand and distributing them all over the world. Dust can fertilize the ocean for plankton and seed the sky for cloud formation.

Sometimes dust storms are just cool to watch, as well. In this series of images from OMI, the dust from a Saharan sand storm blows several thousand kilometers over the North Atlantic and Europe in April 2011.

Read more ...



Dust Blown from Africa to Scandinavia

Date: 04 04 2011

Atmospheric scientists track aerosols because they have important impacts on weather, climate, and human health. Mineral dust is one of the most abundant aerosols, a product of winds blowing across our deserts and beaches, picking up tiny bits of rock and sand and distributing them all over the world. Dust can fertilize the ocean for plankton and seed the sky for cloud formation.

Sometimes dust storms are just cool to watch, as well. In this series of images from OMI, the dust from a Saharan sand storm blows several thousand kilometers over the North Atlantic and Europe in April 2011.

Read more ...



Record Arctic Ozone Loss

Date: 30 03 2011

Recent observations from satellites and ground stations suggest that atmospheric ozone levels for March in the Arctic were approaching the lowest levels in the modern instrumental era. What those readings mean for the remainder of the year is unclear. But what they mean for the long-term is that the recovery from human-induced ozone depletion is an uneven climb.

Read more ...



Record Arctic Ozone Loss

Date: 01 03 2011

Recent observations from satellites and ground stations suggest that atmospheric ozone levels for March in the Arctic were approaching the lowest levels in the modern instrumental era. What those readings mean for the remainder of the year is unclear. But what they mean for the long-term is that the recovery from human-induced ozone depletion is an uneven climb.

Read more ...



Global satellite analysis of the relation between aerosols and short-lived trace gases

Date: 21 02 2011

Most of the anthropogenic aerosol ("man-made") particles are formed in the air from gases like nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and organics. This study investigates the relation between the concentrations of these gases and the concentrations of the aerosols. Therefore, observations of the Dutch-Finnish OMI instrument and the U.S. MODIS instrument have been used. By using global satellite data, different regions on Earth can be compared directly.

This study shows that satellite data provides unique global information on aerosols and their relation with the gases from which they are formed. This information can be used to predict reductions of the aerosol concentrations due to pollution control measures and the resulting climate effects. Aerosols are important for climate forcing, but the magnitude of these effects is poorly quantified.

Read more ...



Ozone Hole through the years

Date: 01 02 2011

This series of images above shows the Antarctic ozone hole on the day of its maximum depletion in four different years; that is, the days with the thinnest ozone layer as measured in Dobson Units (DU). The measurements were made by NASA’s Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instruments from 1979–2003 and by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) from 2004–present.

Read more ...



A Day of Night-Shining Clouds

Date: 28 01 2011

Scientists have a good reason to track noctilucent or polar mesospheric clouds: they are a pretty good gauge of even the tiniest changes in the atmosphere. These "night-shining clouds", as they are sometimes called, are thin, wavy ice clouds that form at very high altitudes and reflect sunlight long after the Sun has dropped below the horizon.

Read more ...



Night-Shining Clouds are Getting Brighter

Date: 27 01 2011

DeLand, an atmospheric scientist with SSAI and NASA's GSFC, has found that polar mesospheric clouds are forming more frequently and becoming brighter. He has been observing the clouds in data from SBUV instruments since 1978 and from 2004 with OMI (see also "A Day of Night-Shining Clouds").

The upward trend in brightness, says DeLand, reveals subtle changes in the atmosphere that may be linked to greenhouse gases.

Read more ...



© OMI -- Last update: Tuesday, 09-May-2017 03:06:14 UTC. --