Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute; Ministery Of Infrastructure And The Environment

Publications, presentations and other activities
Post‐Collapse Gravity Increase at the Summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi
2019
by M.P. Poland (USGS), E. de Zeeuw-van Dalfsen (KNMI), M. Bagnardi (JPL), I.A. Johanson (USGS),

We conducted gravity surveys of the summit area of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi, in November 2018 and March 2019, with the goal of determining whether there was any mass change at depth following the volcano's May–August 2018 caldera collapse. Surface deformation between the two surveys was minimal, but we measured a gravity increase (maximum 44 μGal) centered on the caldera that can be modeled as mass accumulation in a region ~1 km beneath the surface. We interpret this mass increase to be mostly magma accumulation in void space that was created during the summit collapse. Caldera uplift was evident by April 2019, indicating that the magma volume had reached a point where pressurization could be sustained. Modeled gravity change suggests a maximum magma storage rate at Kīlauea's summit duringNovember2018toMarch2019thatismuchlessthanthepre‐2018magmasupplyratetothevolcano.

Bibliographic data
Poland, M.P., E. de Zeeuw-van Dalfsen, M. Bagnardi and I.A. Johanson, Post‐Collapse Gravity Increase at the Summit of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawaiʻi
Geophys. Res. Lett., 2019, 46, 1-10, doi:10.1029/2019GL084901.
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